Paro

Taktshang (Tiger's Nest), Paro

Taktshang (Tiger’s Nest), Paro

Paro Valley
Paro valley is one of the most fertile and beautiful valleys – with patchwork of lush green fields with a clear crystalline river meandering graciously through it. The country’s only international airport is located here which connects to Kathmandu in Nepal, Bagdogra, Delhi, Guwahati, Gaya, Kolkotta and Mumbai in India, Dhaka in Bangladesh, Bangkok, Thailand and Singapore. The country’s holiest and most famous landmark for the visitors – Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) Monastery is here in Paro.

MONUMENTS TO VISIT IN PARO

Ta Dzong : Built in 1656 as a watchtower for Rinpung Dzong is now used as the National Museum which is a repository of not only precious works of art but also costumes, Armour and other hand crafted objects of daily life that provide a good snapshot of the rich cultural traditions of the country.

It opens 7 days a week except on National Holidays.

Rinpung Dzong: Built in 1646 by Lama Zhabdrung Nawang Namgyal and strategically located to thwart Tibetan incursions into the rest of the country, this Dzong became one of Bhutan’s strongest and most important fortresses.

Drukgyal Dzong: Now in ruins the Dzong was built by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal to commemorate the victory over the Tibetan invaders in 1644; thus the name Drukgyal meaning “Victorious Drukpas”. The Dzong was used as an administrative center until 1951 when a fire caused by butter lamp destroyed it. Most of the Tibetan Invasions including the Mongolian Invaders led by the Famous Mongolian General, Gushri Khan were repelled back from this Dzong which has a strategic Defense location.

If the weather is clear you can view the Majestic Mount Jhomolhari (7314m/24,000ft) which lies on the border with Tibet and the locals revere it as the abode of Goddess Jhomo. First climbed in 1937, it is believed the mountaineers stopped short of the summit in difference to local sentiment and it is now a ‘protected peak’.

Drukgyel Dzong (8)

Kyichu Lhakhang: It was built in 659 by the Tibetan King Songtsen Gampo. The temple fell into disrepair but was superbly restored in 1839 by the 25th Je Khempo (Chief Abbot). He also contributed the outstanding statue of Avalokiteshwara, with eleven heads and thousand arms, which is located in the sanctuary.

Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest) Monastery: The hike to Taktshang Monastery perched on a cliff at 2950m/9700ft takes any where from 4 to 6 hours as per your hiking ability. It is an uphill hike to the Monastery. The trail climbs through beautiful pine forest, many of the trees festooned with Spanish moss, and an occasional grove of fluttering prayer flags. There is a cafeteria (Taktsang Jakhang) on the half way.

Legend has it that Guru Padmasambhava (the great Buddhist master) with his magical powers came to Taktshang in the eighth century, flying from the east of the country on the back of a tigress (a form that one of his consorts is believed to have taken). He is said to have meditated for about three months in a cave on the cliff and subdued the evil spirits. The primary Lhakhang was built around Guru Rimpoche’s meditation cave in the 1692 by the fourth Desi Tenzin Rabgay. This incredible monastery clings to the edge of a sheer rock cliff that plunges 900 meters into the valley below.

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